Panama

Panama, known for its famed canal, is a curvy and narrow landmass that serves as a physical and cultural bridge between Central and South America. This skinny isthmus holds hundreds of idyllic deserted islands, densely forested wilderness, and a cosmopolitan city with modern skyscrapers. The terrain of Panama is quite unique—mountainous regions and nutrient-rich volcanic soil create numerous microclimates across the country, which also act as impeccable coffee producing ground.

Coffee’s Role in Panama

Coffee production in Panama can be traced back to the 19th century with the settlement of European immigrants. It reached its peak around the 1990s, when the country produced around 200,000 bags per year. Production since then has steadily declined, but many of the country’s farms are thriving because its volcanic soil, altitude and climate offer an ideal environment for producing specialty coffee. Panama’s reputation in the specialty industry far exceeds its fairly slender offering in terms of quantity.

Regions & Cup profile

There are three primary coffee producing areas that range in elevation from 1,000 to 1,600 meters. While Boquete is the oldest and most well known, Panama is most famous for growing the coveted Geisha varietal. The country’s excellent producers have also developed and perfected unique processing methods (such as ‘wine’ naturals) and offer many exceptional small lots—making it an ideal place for specialty batches. Coffee from Panama is best known for its light body, bright acidity and jasmine-like aroma with notes of honey and citrus.

Harvest Period

November – March

Annual productivity

115,000 bags

Genetic Varieties

Arabica, Cattura, Catuai, Typica, Geisha, Mundo Novo

Growing Regions

Chiriqui Province, Boquete, Volcan, Renacimiento